Theoblogical

Theological Community, EcoTheology, The Church, The World, The Blogosphere
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Naming the Powers in an ecologically endandered world

May 21, 2015 By: Theoblogical Category: Theoblogical

Christians supposedly have had practice in embodying via lifestyle what they preach, but also do not forsake the message for all…I think its a false choice to say “don’t scare people with dire descriptions of the climate crisis but show them what can be done”. We must do both, but I have a better word than “scare”…the message is indeed ” apocalyptic” , because apocalypse means “unveiling”… To pull back the veil and “name the powers” is to unveil an avenue for People’s movements on behalf of the health and well-being of our world (and everything and everyone in it)….the act of a vast majority to say no to an elite powerful few is a big part of “what we can do”.  To be a participant in this is also empowering and encourages; meaning a ” resource for courage”. It has become just that in “Christian America”; to be counted amongst those deeply concerned about life in its totality, which requires a global reaching justice which no longer ” externalizes” costs to climate. We can no longer do this because the interconnectedness of life renders this false. On a finite planet, these costs , like the greenhouse gas that constitute the cause of many of those externals, is trapped with us on a shared planet. They really aren’t external at all.

Obama defends Arctic drilling decision : Short term now, Long Term “later”

May 18, 2015 By: Dale Lature G+ Category: ecotheology, Occupy Theology, OWS, People's Climate

Obama told reporters that although he wants the country to move completely away from fossil fuels at some point, domestic oil and natural gas production is still necessary in the short term.

via Obama defends Arctic drilling decision | TheHill.

When we frame this in terms like “short term” and “long term”,  we get a good indication that the two have already overlapped,  and that the only “long term” worth considering now is the amount climate change mayhem to which we are sentencing “long term” generations by refusing to recognize that NOW is the time to act,  that NOW presents us with the choice of either avoiding a far worse future than that to which we have already committed ourselves by our delay.

The problem with  this climate crisis we face is that “Long term” thinking requires short term action to do serious reversals.  If we don’t,  feedbacks will only accelerate (or increase the acceleration,  since it is already accelerating- which is the nature of feedback loops).  Obama and his administration have chosen the political path, which is never going to allow us to seriously face this.

Obama Still Doesn’t Get It

May 18, 2015 By: Dale Lature G+ Category: ecotheology, Occupy Theology, People's Climate

Bill McKibben speaks truth,  and Obama went a long way toward answering the question as to whether or not he has turned a corner toward becoming the leader in the White House on this issue of climate.  This,  18 months before the next election,  indicates he still doesn’t get it.

what’s most extreme here is the irresponsibility of Shell, now abetted by the White House. A quarter century ago, scientists warned that if we kept burning fossil fuel at current rates we’d melt the Arctic. The fossil fuel industry (and most everyone else in power) ignored those warnings, and what do you know: The Arctic is melting, to the extent that people now are planning to race yachts through the Northwest Passage, which until very recently required an icebreaker to navigate.Now, having watched the Arctic melt, does Shell take that experience and conclude that it’s in fact time to invest heavily in solar panels and wind turbines? No. Instead, it applies to be first in line to drill for yet more oil in the Chukchi Sea, between Alaska and Siberia. Wash, rinse, repeat. Talk about salting wounds and adding insult to injury: It’s as if the tobacco companies were applying for permission to put cigarette machines in cancer wards

via Obama’s Catastrophic Climate-Change Denial – NYTimes.com.

Update:  this is relevant, and hopeful….but will he?
RT @greenpeaceusa: #Arctic Council & StDept Rep Admiral Papp says @BarackObama can still pull Arctic plug on Shell:
bit.ly/1GpkIzH

The needed dogma on climate

May 18, 2015 By: Dale Lature G+ Category: ecotheology, Occupy Theology, People's Climate

I have commented at least a couple of times (probably on Twitter and Facebook) about how we have all these flavors of churches in the U.S. that emphasize certain theological approaches and put forward their own “selective canon” of Scriptures (all groups do this,  according to the narrative they want to emphasize).  But that a group “wants” to emphasize a certain narrative is not, in and of itself,  a critique.  It could be out of a primal, deep desire to have their religious community be attuned to things that address our deepest concerns.  This is the case with me,  and my 7-8 month trek into a new “ecological” thinking (where I do “Ecotheology”)  has me asking about where the communities might be that might righly be deemed a PROLIFE community in the strictest sense:  That ALL OF LIFE,  which neccessarily includes the ecosystem in which that life takes place and from which we receive our breath and being (since God is IN and THROUGHOUT that system ,  and can be said to be EMBODIED by that system. )

So where are they?  I intend to find out.  I intend to seek it out.

To my theology/church friends: I want to know what you think of my previous blog post

May 12, 2015 By: Dale Lature G+ Category: ecotheology, Occupy Theology, People's Climate, Theoblogical

Meaning this one,  here

Theology is ultimately a dialogue,  not just musings of an individual.  But even that is to simplify the matter,  since these “individual musings” have been forged in an ongoing theological dialogue over some 30 years of my experience in seriously contemplating and living theology,  and being formed by numerous individuals and communities,  each of them having been formed in their own journeys and communities.